Gaming for inclusion

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Geoff Cook
Geoff Cook Member (Full) Posts: 40

Gaming for inclusion

In a gaming world often exclusive to the visually impaired, a new dawn emerges with Quantum Guide Play software by JBL, breaking barriers in first-person shooter realms like Counter-Strike 2. For Joshua Tseng, born with congenital glaucoma, this innovation isn't just a tool; it's an enabler of dreams. With only 5% vision, Joshua's gaming options were once limited to rudimentary titles. Now, armed with audio cues and intense practice, he delves into the heart of FPS battles, defying the notion that visually impaired gamers are sidelined.

Yet, Joshua's journey is more than a personal triumph—it's a call for inclusivity. Gaming's accessibility gaps are glaring, with the visually impaired often left in the shadows. While some high-budget games like The Last Of Us offer commendable support, they remain exceptions. Quantum Guide Play isn't just software; it's a beacon of hope, urging the industry toward a more inclusive future.

In a world where every click, every move, should be accessible to all, Quantum Guide Play isn't just about playing games; it's about playing a role in a broader narrative of acceptance and belonging. As Joshua looks forward, envisioning a landscape where every game is within reach, Quantum Guide Play is a testament to innovation's power, turning barriers into bridges and paving the way for a more inclusive gaming world.

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  • Ali Ingersoll
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    How fascinating. I just came back from an event where there was a gaming convention actually and I popped in. It was interesting because I have read about these accessible setups, but there was no representation at the Midwest gaming convention in Milwaukee.